Lääkemolekyylien nimeäminen


Mikä taho päättää, mikä uuden lääkkeen geneeriseksi nimeksi tulee? Kauppanimen arvatenkin saa lääkkeen kehittänyt yritys päättää, mutta kuka antaa nimen itse molekyylille?

Kommentit (2)


Olisiko se IUPAC?

Lääketehtailla lienee sellainen tuntemus IUPAC:n säännöistä, että ovat pystyviä itse nimeämään.


As a chemist you will have a working knowledge of chemical nomenclature, but only a few experts will be so familiar with IUPAC rules that they are able to name (almost) any compound. When you encounter an unfamiliar compound and need to name it, Autonom may be useful. You need to be able to draw the structure of the compound.

Autonom is a windows-based program which generates IUPAC names from graphic structures. It works from a library of about 7,000 entries, with an additional index of functional groups. It claims to have an 85% success rate in naming structures, and that it will not give incorrect names, but will give a warning if a structure cannot be named. Templates are available to simplify the drawing process. Autonom is available on a PC in the Library Computer Room. Further information and examples can be viewed here


The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) grew out of the international recognition of a need for standardisation in chemistry. It is the recognised world authority on chemical nomenclature, terminology, symbols, units, atomic weights and related topics.

The IUPAC Home Page provides access to the full text of a number of IUPAC recommendations, including: IUPAC Glossary of Organic Class Names; Nomenclature of Amino Acids and Peptides; Steroid Nomenclature.

A single compound may have many different names in the chemical literature. For example, the simple compound: H2NCH2CH2OH can be named: 2-Aminoethanol, 2-Aminoethyl alcohol, 2-Hydroxyethylamine, beta-Hydroxyethylamine, 2-Hydroxyethanamine, or 1-Amino-2-; and also has the less systematic ("trivial") name Ethanolamine.

http://gethelp.library.upenn.edu/guides ... emnom.html